Mandalay: Eating Gold Leaf and Transit to Yangon

A small store at one of our bus stops to Yangon
A small store at one of our bus stops to Yangon

Morning of day 10 in Myanmar finds me deliberately waking up late. I made sure I’m well rested for tonight’s bus ride to Yangon. I took the day easy enjoying the comforts of the hotel and catching up to my online world. When I checked out, I left my baggage at the reception and decided to visit one of the Gold Leaf Workshops in Mandalay. A Gold leaf sheet is an essential part of the day-to-day lives of Burmese people. It’s their main offering to Buddha where they place it on layers on their images. And some even goes to eating a leaf a day and claims to give them good health.

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Mandalay: Quiet Beauty of Shwe In Bin Kyaung and the Famous Mahamuni Paya

Shwe In Bin Kyaung Monastery Monks
Shwe In Bin Kyaung Monastery Monks

From Mandalay Hill, we continued on our “US$10 Combo Ticket Free” route in Mandalay. The US$10 Combo Ticket is a government fee that can give access to several tourist sites in Mandalay. I wasn’t keen on spending on it as I’ll use it to pay for my driver instead. There are alternative sites in Mandalay that are equally good but doesn’t need that combo ticket. Like the Sandamuni Paya which is an alternative to the nearby Kuthodaw Paya. Mandalay Hill sometimes has ticket inspectors but an alternative hill is Yankin Paya. Now we’re off to two more impressive sites – a beautiful ‘teak monastery’ and the most important religious site in Mandalay.

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Mandalay: A Barefoot Climb on a Crowded Mandalay Hill

The Gigantic Bobokyi Nat guardians at the foot of Mandalay Hill
The Gigantic Bobokyi Nat guardians at the foot of Mandalay Hill

The soles of my feet already felt very thick it would probably take a few foot scrub sessions to take out the dead skin and callouses from too much walking. By this time, after entering many temples and sacred grounds for almost a week, I’m already used to removing my footwear before entering temples. For Mandalay Hill, my next place to visit, I had to remove my slippers before climbing the 760-feet high hill. I really don’t mind the climb since after the two gigantic Bobyoki Nat guardian statues is a shaded stair pathway leading to the summit. What amused me was the footwear storage at the foot of the hill with a sign “Footwear not Allowed. Don’t carry shoes” clearly directed at foreigners where they’ll have to pay to store them. I saw a lot of locals carrying their shoes inside plastics so I just decided to clip my slippers to my bag and started the climb.

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Mandalay: Sandamuni and Kyauktawgyi Paya

The impressive and free Sandamuni Paya
The impressive and free Sandamuni Paya


I arrived at the familiarly busy, Highway Bus Station in Mandalay by 6am. I was wide awake, having been able to sleep during the bus ride due to exhaustion. I waded through the crowd of touts by the bus entrance and immediately tried to look for motorbike ride to town. A guy with cleanly pressed white long-sleeved shirt wearing a red longyi hailed if I needed a ride. He seemed decent enough and his English quite good so I hired him to take me to downtown. I’m glad I’m back in Mandalay.

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In Transit: An Arduous Journey and a Kind Soul at Inle Lake

The Ticket counters and bus companies at Mandalay Highway Bus Station
The Ticket counters and bus companies at Mandalay Highway Bus Station

If only I could say “stop!” while our mini-bus rode through the rolling terrain of Kalaw State at the break of dawn. I wanted to halt the mini-bus not because my legs and feet remained immobile for hours. My legs were cramped in a corner, just behind the front seats of a full, air-cooled mini-bus headed to Inle Lake, but the scenery at Kalaw state and the rest of the Shan hills vast expanse were draped in a mysterious mist billowing overland. The morning sun cast beams of light in the mist resulting to a dramatic diffusion of light and shadows over the hilly plateau. It was one of the most magnificent sights I’ve seen on the road.

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In Transit: Bus to Mandalay from Bagan, Train to Pyin U Lwin

Train to Pyin U Lwin
Train to Pyin U Lwin

I thought the train was finally moving after at least an hour of waiting, but it was just my consciousness, slipping and sliding in two worlds. My reality blurred from fatigue and lack of sleep as I lean on the side of an open train window in the cart, oblivious of the passing crowd and vendors at the station. I am going to Pyin U Lwin (pyuu-lin), a cool scenic hill town, east of Mandalay,  straight from an almost 8 hour overnight bus journey from Bagan. But I was awake the full day before and the bus ride didn’t offer a chance to sleep. It was already 15 minutes past 6am when the train finally rolled on the tracks. That’s already 2 hours late from its original time of departure. But I was just relieved the 4-hour train journey had started.

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Mandalay: Rooming at Mandalay View Inn via Roomorama.com

My room at Mandalay View Inn
My room at Mandalay View Inn


“It’s whole new way to stay” says roomarama.com. It’s a pretty attractive strapline if you ask me. Looking into their site, it caters for different kind of travellers from the smart, adventurous and independent traveller like me. Roomorama.com offered to try out their services and since I have a two week trip in Myanmar, I thought it would be great to try them out there. That led me to this fancy boutique hotel Mandalay View inn.

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