Good morning Vietnam: A Vietnamese Breakfast

Breakfast with the Vietnamese

Breakfast with the Vietnamese

Another thing I learned about the Vietnamese is that they are very lazy when in comes to breakfast. Our guide Lee Tien, told us that most of them after waking up and before going to work usually just stops by at the nearest corner food stall and eat a quick Vietnamese breakfast.

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A day in SG 03: Temple hopping in Little India

Serangoon Road in LIttle India

Serangoon Road in LIttle India

After my walk in China Town, I took an MRT to Singapore’s Little India. Immediately after stepping out of the MRT station up in the streets, I was greeted by a faint scent of incense and unknown spices in the air. I walked towards the Serangoon Road, the main road which intersects the community, is also one of Singapore’s oldest roads.

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A taste of Portuguese

Dining at Portualia

Portuguese food at Portugalia, D’mall, Boracay

It’s always a treat to the palate to taste something new and delicious, especially dishes from other countries. Chef Antonio of Portugalia Reastaurant, managed to satisfy our taste buds with authentic Portuguese Food. (more…)

Squids galore

Squids

The best tasting squid dish I’ve tasted in the island of Boracay can be found in Escondido Resort, Station 1.

Tahooooo!

Taho

Taho (Geerlig’s cheese in english, Filipino’s popoular street side nutritional beverage

Tahoooo! Tahoo kayo dyan! Hehehe.

This Soy packed protein-powered drink has been somewhat a regular beverage for me in the morning. Yeah it’s cheap and delicious as well. Sometimes to add variety, I add some flavored powder like strawberry. You should try it. It taste great!

Sagada revisited final: Still a Shangri-la

Pine Forest

A walk into Sagada’s Pine Forest

Three nights have passed and just when it has begun, we realize we are about to leave. You’ll never get dull in this place as there are more to do and discover. I could have stayed longer but work beckons. I would gladly like to walk more on the pine forest and feel the cool fresh breeze. Or just lie down on the grass by the church and read a good book. Watch the glorious sunrise on a cool windy morning at Kiltepan or the scenic sunset while having a picnic at Lake Danom (Lake Bana-ao to those who live in Besao). Or further more discover more hidden secrets Sagada holds. We were conversing with some elders at a store and found that beneath Sagada there are more cave systems waiting to be explored.

Kiltepan View

Breathtaking view of Kiltepan

I will miss those cheap but full dishes (Chicken, vegetables and a large serving of Red Rice) at Sudimay, the vegetable rice at Shamrock Cafe, the Chicken barbecue with matching acoustic music at the new Bamboo Grill and those tasty Yogurt meals at Yogurt house. I regret having not bought a bottle of those Blueberry Rice Wine I was able to taste. Or to zip on the aroma of a mountain tea. (more…)

Sagada Revisited 02: For your eyes only

Sagada Dap-ay

Sagada’s Dap-ay. They have these “Palay” altar in the middle. It was a sign for the farmers to stop the harvest for a given time and they are not allowed in the ricefields since the “Anito’s” are the ones doing the harvest at that time.

People of Sagada still practices their old traditions and rituals. A walk through their native village of Demang, you’ll sure to pass by a number of Dap-Ay’s. Dap-ay, also called Ato by different tribes is a low-roofed, windowless structure with a small door. In front is a circular structure where improvised stone stools surround the edges and a hearth at the center where they burn fire. This is a sacred place for them as this is where the council of elders makes major decisions regarding socio-political issues, religious rites, settle disputes and where young boys are passed the lessons about disciplines, customs, traditions and taboos.

Speaking of Taboo, women aren’t allowed to go inside the Dap-ay for some reasons. I wasn’t also allowed to take a photo of this ongoing Dap-ay for harvest. They were asking for “Wine” for every shot taken (Ok That was a bit suspicious). which eventually I didn’t give them as I don’t have any at that time.

Preparing a Pinikpikan Chicken

Preparing a Pinikpikan chicken. Blowtorching the chicken after it has been beaten up to death. Had to cover up her face since they really didn’t want their pictures taken doing this. Have to go really far and use my cams maximum zoom to take this shot.

Another interesting thing in Sagada are their food. A tasty meal I heard is the Pinikpikan Chicken, which have a unique way of preparing. It’s actually a ceremonial dish where they patted (more of like beat) the chicken until the blood clots and die. Then they burn (torch) off the feathers after. Animal rights may scream “Torture” on this preparation, but we must understand that this is an old ritual. Originally, before the chicken is broiled or cooked, they slice it open and the blood would reveal a “Reading” which every villagers share. (more…)